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released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
when negotiations with the taliban move forward and it also may have very big repercussions for the u.s. effort in the south. people called president hamid karzai's brother a corrupt gangster. but the cia's former head of counterterrorism says the u.s. may miss him. >> it's quite like live that what follows is going to be something that will not work to our interest. >> reporter: an afghan official says he was gunned down in his own home, shot in the head and chest by his own guard. the taliban took credit, but it's not clear if the shooter was really working for them. >> the united states condemns in the strongest possible terms the murder of president karzai's half brother in kandahar. >> a u.s. official said quote, while we must deal with ahm ahmed wali karzai, he's widely understood to be corrupt and narcotics trafficker. the state department and u.s. military were trying to build trust in the afghan government. they frequently criticized ahmed wali, but the cia worked with him. >> i think often parts of the u.s. government were working at cross purposes where ahmed wali was conce
-- get this -- the taliban? we have details of a disturbing new report. >>> the death toll is at 76 in the massive blast and shooting in norway. the suspect behind the attack was in court today, defending his alleged motives. let's bring in michael holmes from norway with the very latest. what is going on right now, 34r50i michael? >> right now, they just had this memorial march. a couple hundred thousand people marched with flowers from the city square down here to the cathedral. in court today, though, it was quite an odd sort of situation early on. the media thought they were going to be able to get in. the police didn't want them to come in because they were worried about him making a message to to possible co-conspirators. let's show you how the day unfolded, wolf. >> dozens of journalists from around the world gathered at the courthouse. the judge asked for a closed room. flart references made by the accused in his statements to police and to the court hearing have given statements that require further court investigation, including a statement about, quote, two more cells in
planned. u.s. officials say they killed 120 insurgents. many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda damaging their network. the clashes reveal that al qaeda for years, said to be mostly across the border in pakistan is a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban i know. they're getting gutsy. right past there. if you go past that you're going to take enemy contact, it's pretty certain. >> the afghans are clear about who lay in weight for them ahead. >> translator: it's very dangerous, there are taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading. nick payton walsh, cnn a
discovered during a trip to remote afghanistan, there are signs that the taliban and al qaeda see an opening. >> reporter: we pushed down into the valley. still an insurgent stronghold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from up the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic for the taliban around here. they're getting gutsy. if you push up farther than that, you're going to take enemy contact. it's pretty certain. >> nick payton walsh joins us from kabul. the lieutenant said the taliban is getting, quote, pretty gutsy. where does this confidence come from, and does it it stem in part from the fact they know the americans are leaving? >> reporter: i think that's true to a certain extent. the gutsiness is perhaps a suggestion that some fighters there are foreign. u.s. officials identifying what they believe were safe havens there before they launched a large operation into that particular area. the focus was on pakistan's safe havens there. that where many in washington believe al qaeda was hiding. big concerns they naif found a breathing space in afghani
murdoch's newscorp operation. this one is interesting. the taliban claims it was a victim. the group accusing the u.s. of hacking in to its cell phones to send false text messages saying that its leader, mullah omar was dead. we're following the story. we go live to kabul, afghanistan. david, this one has got people wondering. what's going on? >> reporter: well, the news first broke by an afghan television station and then later in the day, cnn and other media received a message by an individual claiming to be a top taliban commander. that individual said that mullah omar had died of heart failure last week and a successor had already been named. the taliban, like you said, later came out and said they have been the victim of a hacking and their phones and emails have been tapped. in fact this message was phoney. cnn doesn't have any confirmation of the sort. we spoke with nato official and they have no operational knowledge on the ground. so the whereabouts of mullah omar are unknown. last believed to be in pakistan, where taliban militants have launched attacks across that border a
planned. u.s. officials say they killed 120 insurgents and top leaders, many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. yet the clashes revealed that al qaeda for years said to be mostly across the border in pakistan is again a concern, back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent stronghold. high tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from up the valley. >> it is uncharacteristic for the taliban, i know, from around here. they're getting pretty gutsy. right past there, usually our patrols don't push it too far past that. if you push it far past that, you'll take enemy contact, it is pretty certain. >> reporter: the afghans clear about who lay in wait for them ahead. >> translator: it is very dangerous. there are taliban, arabs,
's gone too far. >> paul thank you for joining us. appreciate your time. >> thank you. >>> the taliban is getting in on the phone hacking thing. the afghan group insists its phones and website were hacked and that's what caused the announcement that its leader had died. the taliban now insists its chief is alive. denies that he died of a heart attack in spite of the text message and web announcement that went out. the taliban blames u.s. intelligence agencies for the hack. >>> a stark warning from the capitol. we're in the debt deadline danger zone. time is running out to get a deal done. just 13 days left. and now there are three debt proposals being debated on capitol hill. none of them with any kind of consensus. yesterday the republican-led house passed cut, cap and balance. the tea party backed plan calls for deep spending cuts, a balanced cap and balanced budget amendment. republicans cheered the plan, democrats say it's a nonstarter. >> it's time for republicans in the house and the senate to end the political shenanigans to drop their doa plan to cap, cut and kill medicare and
takes tougher action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan as i was mentioning. panetta is meeting with american military leaders as well as afghan officials. atia abawi is in kabul, afghanistan. he's making strong remarks when it comes to al qaeda and how he wants to continue stamping them out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. that's absolutely right. on his flight from d.c. to kabul he did speak to reporter on the plane that he was on about al qaeda and said that the strategic defeat of al qaeda was within reach, pointing to the death of osama bin laden, pointing to the information that we were able to retrieve from his compound, including the names of key leaders that they'd like to go after. and he says that this is the time to go after al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> reporter: al qaeda aside, this is afghanistan. he's on
again. >> they held a more hawkish opinion the so-called gang of three from washington said the taliban would never seriously negotiate peace with the u.s. >> the planned drawdown is an unnecessary risk. i hope and pray every night that the drawdown will still allow us to succeed. i have very little doubt if we are deprived in a significant degree to the fighting season which was planned for eastern began stn. >> s senator mccain told me he would be two steps forward one step back for many years to come. general david petraeus leaves this fabled graveyard filled with america's own sacrifices but with a new mission to minimize further losses here and prevent threats back on home soil. dominique denatali fox news. >> senior officials believe iran transferred new weapons to allies from iraq to allies. the revolutionary guard has given the taliban long range rockets and sent them exploding projectiles to iraq. it considers them american propaganda. a boat packed with refugees bound for saudi arabia sank off the coast of the sudan. it is clear 200 people died. three migrants have been rescue
heat under a heat alert. some areas feel as hot as 126 degrees. . >>> the taliban blaming u.s. hackers for a text that announced the death of mullah omar. the taliban says, no, he is alive and well. >>> one day after rupert murdoch tried to repel the british assault on his empire, it's the prime minister's turn to face parliament. david cameron tainted by claims that he was too cozy with the media giant and drew raucous responses in his appearance before the special session. >> what is the public expects is not petty political point scoring but a -- what -- what they want, what they deserve is concerted action to rise to the level of events and pledge to work together to sort this issue out once and for all and it is in that spirit that i commend this statement to the house! >> across great britain, public and political outrage has been boiling over claims of police bribery, phone hacking and a heartless abuse of power. james and rupert murdoch walked into parliament knowing that they had to tamp down some of that public anger so did they succeed some atika shubert is in london now. wh
fighters, using the secluded also fine villages for training and planning. many taliban, several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. yet the clashes reveal al qaeda said mostly to be across the border in pakistan is again a concern, back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we push down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high tech american attack helicopters buzzed overyaed until militants shot from them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban. they're getting pretty gutsy. if you push up any farther past that, you're going to take enemy contact, that's pretty certain. >> the afghans clear about who lay in wait ahead of them. >>. >> translator: it's very draws, taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. >> al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading slipping back in, just when a
here. >> that's my question. can pakistan's military take on the taliban and militancy without u.s. money and resources, reza? >> reporter: well, look. they have a big army. 600,000 soldiers. it's one of the biggest armies of the world. they are not the best trained army, not the most proficient when it comes to fighting and insurgency. fighting that the taliban, that they've needed the help of the u.s. in the past, but, again, they're saying they don't need the help anymore. they're going to continue to fight without the u.s.' help. but it doesn't square with previous statements made in the past. previous demands for the u.s. to give them more money, give them resources, claims that they need help. now they say they don't need help. i think this is gamesmanship and i think all of this really underscores a troubled relationship, but i think what's important to point out is though the relationship is hurting there is no indication that it will end. both countries realize that they need one another so i think there are indications that it will stagger forward despite the troubles.
wasn't discovered on the way in. making sure no taliban soldiers saw him so he could be outed to the taliban. instead his intent all along was to kill people. so he seemed to good to be true in some ways, and in fact he was. >> joby, i wonder, between the events of september 11th or the battle of december '01 and take down, did we have a line on bin laden al zawahari, but the coldness of the trail allowed us to be dropped. we were so dress pratt for the right reasons yet either of them that we wanted it believe this guy was legitimate. >> yes. if you think about it, there are many people that claim that, yes, we know where osama bin laden was hiding. this trail went cold for years. this was an accident to get close to him, or at least to his deputy, perhaps days way from a really important strike. so yes, everybody was excited and not just to the cia but to the white house. and there was, as we look back, quite a rush as we meet this guy and see what he had to say. >> the book is titled the triple agent. he started out blogging as a hater of all things western and wanting bloo
qaeda in the strength that al qaeda existed several years ago. i's probably not the taliban. it's the history. the flow of the country. having dinner with a young marine corps captain, they said if they removed every weapon from the taliban and cleansed every village of a weapon, they would throw rocks at us. they don't want us there. it's time to come home. >> john heilman, you are chasing them across america in this decade long war in afghanistan. are they talking about it? do they care about it? are they focused on it? do they talk? >> more of the latter than the former. people generally talk about it in the aspect of being asked about it. it's not on the top five list of voters. >> any presidential candidates? >> you have to have a position on it. what's interesting is because the public turned decisively against the wars. >> what does michele bachmann say? she's a tea party candidate. what does she say ability the war? >> she's been relatively silent on the issue. it's been among the main street candidates. mitt romney -- >> huntsman. >> huntsman and romney taking a positio
are monitoring a fierce overnight gun battle between the taliban and nato force in afghanistan. nato is handing over security to afghan force in fact for the first time today. u.s. troops also begin their exit. is afghanistan ready to control its own destiny? and, disturbing new information on how second-hand smoke may affect your kids. dr. isadore rosenfeld is here with his sund"sunday house calld that is next. you could save a bundle with geico's multi-policy discount. geico, saving people money on more than just car insurance. ♪ geico, saving people money on more than just car insurance. morning starts with arthritis pain... that's two pills before the first bell. [ bell rings ] it's time for recess... and more pills. afternoon art starts and so does her knee pain, that's two more pills. almost ne, but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve cause it can relieve pain all day with just two pills. this is lisa... who switched to aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief oaleve in liquid gels. >> jamie: welcome back, here's the headlines we're following for
was shot by a bodyguard, a man karzai trusted and close to them for years. the taliban has claimed responsibility saying the shooter worked for them. >>> leon panetta has strong words for the iraq government while expressing the delay keeping troops in the country through the end of the year deadline. the secretaries y of defense wa baghdad monday and he met with troops at camp victory there where he took several questions. one san diego asks if the iraq leaders were ready to take over. i want you to listen to panetta's response. >> there are people that are going to disagree, there are people that are going to have different views. that's got to play out. that's what's happening here. very frankly sometimes it can be frustrating. i'd like things to move faster here in terms of the decision-making process. i'd like them to make a decision. do you want to stay or not stay? do you want a minister of defense or a not a minister of defense, but damn it, make a decision. >> leon panetta. he stressed iraqi leaders need to crack down on armed groups targeting u.s. forces. here's what's co
back the afghanistan taliban we are state sponsors of terrorists. good start. not enough. see what is next. hope that our government doesn't fold. i think the good sign is our government is finally, finally, in the face of overwhelming evidence, pakistanis were hiding bin laden, et cetera, they are wising up. admiral mullen, the outgoing chairman of the joint chiefs is measured in his speech last week accused the pakistani intelligence of killing one of the leading journalists. that tells me something is changing. it is about time. >> a lot of people are saying in support of this move, we are done trying to win the hearts and mines of pakistanis and by tightening the noose that could force them to be amenable to our needs than they have been. do you agree? >>guest: the pakistanis regard us as an enemy and they take us for all they can get. when we freeze the stuff they need such as body armour and night vision goggles but the demonstration in syria was run by the syrian government organized by the security forces and the syrians have upped the ante. i have to give a shout out to ou
troops fatally shot a demonstrator one day after 21 civilians died. >>> the taliban claiming new success in their attempts to weaken government of afghanistan. a key advisor to karzai was killed today inside the home, his home by three attackers. a member of parliament also died in the attack. president karzai's half brother who was also a government official was assassinated less than a week ago. >>> also in afghanistan, general david petraeus pet will hand over command of nato troops monday to marine corps general john allen. petraeus is retiring from the army. president obama has chosen petraeus to be the next director of the cia. >>> hosni mubarak briefly slipped into a coma today before regaining consciousness. his condition is now stable. hosni mubarak has been hospitalized since april. this isn't the only health concern for the former president. >> we have to know about the situation is that hosni mubarak's health since he's been ousted from power is deteriorating. he's being charged here in egypt with crimes with regard to his rule of almost 30 years and cracking town on the upri
insurgents and top leaders, many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. yet, the clashes reveal that al qaeda, for years, said to be mostly across the border in pakistan is again a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we push down into the valley, still an insurgent stronghold. high-tech american helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them up in the valley. >> uncharacteristic for the taliban around here. they are getting gutsy. past there usually patrols don't push up far past that because if you do, you're going to take enemy contact, pretty certain. >> reporter: the afghans clear about who lay and wait for them ahead. [ speaking in foreign language ] >> translator: they are talibans and arabs and poickets there. >> reporter: the foot of the valley, the american base is hit by pot shots sometimes by lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for
over this month and, panetta said he hoped to drive the taliban to peace talks during the period when u.s. force draw down and is key they keep the pressure up now so there is a chance of some kind of reconciliation in the country. back to you, jamie. >> jamie: thanks so much, david. >> eric: so is secretary panetta's assessment of al qaeda on target or is the install installed pentagon chief possibly speaking too early? for more, let's bring in fox news contributor and former ambassador totty nations, john bolton, who joins us this morning from jerusalem. good morning, ambassador. >> good morning, glad to be here. >> eric: panetta's prediction sounds awfully optimistic. you hope he's right. we got bin laden. does that mean in your view we can actually finish off al qaeda, once and for all? >> well, you know, this is almost 180° switch for the administration. president obama had told us for some time that those old-fashioned concepts of victory and defeat were really outmoded and we need to think about success, rather than victory. now, we have secretary panetta, saying that merely by
the pakistanis for some of the troops they sent to the border to combat al qaeda and the taliban. then there's also a lot of equipment that the u.s. can't get to pakistan if pakistan won't allow its personnel on the ground. because that aid and the personnel come as a package deal. >> okay. now you know there's less aid going to pakistan. you have to wonder what kind of trust or eroded trust might there be now between pakistan and the u.s. to work together from here on out? >> it's really bad. there's been a lot of tit for tat after that raid on bin laden. then the pakistanis threw out the american trainers denying the visas. now the u.s. is withholding aid. you've got to wonder, as you said, what is this going to mean, this continued tit for tat? in the past in previous years when the u.s. has withheld aid, it's been very bad. you've seen a lot of drone strikes against pakistan without pakistani cooperation. sometimes they do cooperate. but now i think you're going to see a lot of the u.s. kind of going it alone as it sends a message to pakistan as it did after 9/11. you're either with us o
to be extended over the next two years. >> the taliban is claiming responsibility for the attack. >>> the murdoch phone hacking scandal in britain has claimed its first public official. just hours ago, britain's top cop suddenly resigned. his resignation comes on the same day police arrested a top murdoch executive. let's bring in cnn's atika shubert. atika, is there a connection between the resignation and the arrest of that top murdoch executive? >> well, there are basically two different strands of the same scandal. in the place of sir paul stevenson, the topmost senior police officer here in britain, he basically resigned because of increasing intense scrutiny over the relationship between the metropolitan police and "news of the world." that tabloid that was shut down because of those phone hacking allegations. and basically there was a former "news of the world" editor, neil wallace, who it turns out was paid by the metropolitan police to be a communications consultant. sir paul stevenson was taking a lot of flak for that. now, he resigned saying he feels he's done nothing wrong, his integr
in afghanistan is to basically end al qaeda and get the taliban under control so it doesn't go back to what it was in the past and to create a stability there so they don't threaten us in the future. so that doesn't become again the breeding ground for a tax on america the way it was in 2001. we're not there yet. afghanistan is a state of chaos and confusion, not in a state where we can honestly say in good conscience that we've put it in a situation where we don't need to be there in order to protect ourself. and here's what i think has been a big lack of leadership. somebody's got to explain to the american people that we need to be in that region of the world for the indefinite future. without time limits. far more effective would be you put in the truth, you don't tell anybody when you're going to leave. we leave when he accomplish our objective. >> a final domestic question. in the next couple weeks the first same-sex marriages will take place legally in new york. you have always said that you were for civil unions but that you thought marriage was between a man and a woman. >> and i s
of the last year, the taking away of important safe haivens inside afghanistan from the taliban. there's clearly tough work and fighting that lies ahead. i repeatedly said while the progress is significant, for example, it remains fragile and reversible. >>> general david patreaus spending his eighth fourth of july and his last as commander of allied forces in afghanistan visiting the troops in the southern part of that country yesterday. welcome back to morning joe, pat buchanan and gerald ford with us. best-selling author and wes moore, good to have you on the show this morning. patreaus will start the new job as director of the cia in september. he talks about the hard work ahead. the changes in the troops. any gut feeling about how that will transpire? >> one transition we'll see is as we're leaving the 10,000 and the 20,000, how that's going to change in terms of troop alignment and geoloe geography. we'll see a shift towards the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you,
canned -- kandahar hunting for the taliban. but then he went back to afghanistan. >> i spent a lot of time with route clearance units looking for i.u.d.s. my vehicle never got hit. i was very, very lucky. when you run up there and pull open the door and see your injured buddies, you never forget that sight. >> this time back home, he began to explore the science of brain injury. >> what happens when the brain gets hit by a blast wave and slams up against the inside of the skull? >> with colleagues at new york university, parker built new tools to discover how a blast affects the brain. it could be years before this leads to new treatments, but parker hopes eventually will have a broad impact. >> a concussion a football player suffers or a car accident and your head snaps forward or shaken baby syndrome. these are all examples of head injuries that can cause a traumatic brain injury. >> today his lab is humming with young graduate students. about half a dozen are veterans. >> we're very focused on this because these are our buddies. these are our guys. this could have been us. it mi
as a guard with the international security assistance forces against the taliban. the provencial government received training from the isaf and was one of the most trusted commanders for the karzais. mohammad was shot dead by other guards after he killed ahme ahmed wali karzai on tuesday. hugo chavez is expected to travel to brazil for cancer treatment. chavez said the next phase of his treatment could require radiation and chemotherapy. the type of cancer is that that sha krez is battling is und undisclos undisclosed. he says despite his illness, he's still in charge of his country. >> he got initial treatment in cuba, now he's going to brazil. what's wrong with the doctors in venezuela? >> i think he wants probably the best for his money. and we certainly know he has a lot of money. >> it's a vote of no confidence inform venezuela but a vote of confidence for cuba and brazil. >> we don't know of the kind of cancer he has. >> i guess when his life is at stake, he's willing to go ahead and deal with that kind of situation. thank very much. credit agencies are warning of big trouble if the u
trusted guards. the taliban claims the guard, who was also killed, was working for them. >> top lawmakers going back to the white house this afternoon for another round of tense debt talks. republicans still refusing to accept a deal with any tax hikes in it and the president is warning there won't be enough money to cover social security checks if they don't raise the debt ceiling by august 2nd. ♪ ♪ rocket man ♪ rocket man ♪ i'm burning out >> good morning, "atlantis." the crew of the final shuttle mission woke up to a fitting tune this morning, elton john's "rocket man." crews will spend most of the day transferring equipment and supplies to the international space station. astronauts completed the final spacewalk of the shuttle era yesterday. the 160th spacewalk devoted to building and plain take the international space station yao back to our top story, the debt talks. president obama and lawmakers from both parties will meet to try to hammer out a deal to raising the nation's debt ceiling. republican leaders have refused to consider any tax hikes and the president says if the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)

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